A Travellerspoint blog

Plantation Homes

Our friends had another day spare to show us around! We were picked up at 9.30am to go to Destrahan Plantation. It was built in 1787 and was 30 mins from New Orleans.

The land surrounding New Orleans is fertile for sugar cane growing. Grand mansions with double galleries and columned facades sprung up along the Mississippi River. These antebellum mansions stratech along the famous river road – a 70 mile stretch between New Orleans & Baton Rouge. They had high ceilings

The levee used to be 4 feet high and back then you could see the river and the steamers coming down it . Now the levee is 40 foot high and the river is no longer seen.

New Orleans was a 3 day buggy ride from these homes and everyone would go to town of Mardi Gras after harvest to find a prospective partner .

The entry fee was $ 17 and this house was at one time empty and full of cows. It was so interesting and sad to see how they and the slaves lived that time.

They took us to another amazing restaurant where we had the bet seafood. It was not a flash place but seriously fabulous in every way !!!

Another 30 minute along the river is famous Oak Alley Plantation that has been in many movies. ( 1 hour from New Orleans) because of the most amazing avenue of arched oak trees which are 400 years old.

In the early 1700's an unknown settler planted 28 evenly spaced oak trees in 2 rows leading from his cottage to the Mississippi river. They are a ¼ mile long and were planted to channel the breeze from the river to the house.

In 1839 a wealthy creole sugar cane planter built the present mansion

Oak trees can live 600 years & these magnificent trees are 400 years old. The largest tree has a girth of 30 feet and 1127 foot spread of limbs . Many of the limbs go onto and along the ground.

On the trees is a bright green growth called resurrection moss which is an air plant that grows on bark of large trees. It survives long periods of drought by shriveling up and appearing dead and grey. Once watered it opens up and is a vibrant green. It can be seen hanging off trees everywhere.

The guides that showed us around were dressed in period costume.

In 1836 there was 57 slaves who lived in slave accommodation of 2 rows of 10 slave cabins The plantation had a big bell that could be heard 4 miles away & was used for emergencies . It had different rings. The bell called slaves & workers to the field, signaled meal breaks, end of day and emergencies such as fire

Kitchens were always in adjoining buildings because of fires

In the big house sons moved out of the main house at 15 years old into an adjoining building.

Girls were married at 12 – 13 years old to men often 20 years older

Had a mint julep - mint & lemonade – non alcoholic which was delicious and praline ice-cream - so good!!

Big bridges over the Bayous that are everywhere

Big bridges over the Bayous that are everywhere


Destrehan

Destrehan


Grey moss - Resurrection fern

Grey moss - Resurrection fern


Grey moss everywhere

Grey moss everywhere


Leigh and Cathy

Leigh and Cathy


Destrehan  Plantation

Destrehan Plantation


Grey Moss

Grey Moss


Info

Info


Info

Info


Sun on the  Mississipi

Sun on the Mississipi


Mississipi River

Mississipi River


Levee

Levee


Amazing lunch

Amazing lunch


Leigh getting into it

Leigh getting into it


Oak Alley

Oak Alley


Oak Alley

Oak Alley


Plantation slaves

Plantation slaves


Slave Definition

Slave Definition


Oak Alley

Oak Alley


Branches growing on the ground

Branches growing on the ground


The Dining Room

The Dining Room


Bedroom

Bedroom


Bedroom

Bedroom


View of the oaks from the verandah

View of the oaks from the verandah


400 year old oak trees

400 year old oak trees


The plantation bell

The plantation bell


The house

The house


Me

Me


Me

Me


Stunning trees

Stunning trees


Oak alley

Oak alley


Slave cabins

Slave cabins


Slave cabin

Slave cabin

Posted by hillbillyramsey 17:00 Archived in USA

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