A Travellerspoint blog

Wedding bells in St Cuthberts

Caught the bus to Bath, which took 4 hours. Stephen & Michele picked us up & took us to the cathedral town of Wells where the wedding was to be held. It is a beautiful little town & you can walk everywhere & the streets are narrow & some cobble stoned.

Mum & Dad were staying around the corner from Michael & I at the White Hart Inn, opposite the cathedral where we had stayed as a family in 1972 when we first came to England. We were in bed & breakfast around the corner in a big roomy attic room

Friday:

We visited Wells Cathedral which was the first completely gothic cathedral built in the 12th & 13th centuries. The West front is almighty panorama of the last judgment. The 600-year-old astronomical clock sound the quarter hours by the jousting knights

Next to the cathedral is the Bishops Palace built in the 13th century. Here are found the springs from which Wells took its name - it feeds the moat & supplies the water that flows through High St. The swans in the moat ring the bell when they are hungry. Nearby we walked to Vicars Close, one of the oldest cobblestoned streets in England completed in 1348

Saturday:

Today my little brother Stephen was getting married. In the morning Mum, Dad, Michael & I met up with him to do a walk along the public paths to the nearby villages of Duncoe & Dinder. We set off up a hill on a path, which ended up being very muddy & slippery on the way down. When we reached stiles & gates where all the sheep & cows had gathered it was so muddy! We were in hysterics as we tried to navigate through the mud without ending up in it!! At times we had so much mud on the soles of our feet we felt like we were trying to walk on slippery bricks!! There was much laughter & hilarity but poor Stephen was not impressed as he had other ideas in his head of how the morning of the wedding should be spent & it wasn't getting muddy but sitting in a pub having a pint with his Dad!! Of course we didn't know this till afterwards! We walked to a couple of nearby villages & I absolutely fell in love with this way of traversing the country from village to village, crossing fields, farms & forests. We walked back to Wells by the road to clean up in time for the wedding. Michael was a greeter at the church door & took his responsibilities seriously & did them well

They got married in St Cuthbert's Church which is the largest parish church in Somerset & was built in the 14th & 15th century. It had a magnificent painted ceiling.

The reception was held in the dining room of the Swan Hotel as there weren’t many of us (around 20) we sat around a big oval table. It was lovely that Aunty Joy came as well as my cousin Hilary & her mum Aunty Hilda. It was a great night Michael had a lot of fun & befriended 2 girls just younger than him that had come from Australia. We had quail for entrée & venison for the main meal

Sunday:

Michael & I caught a bus to the nearby town of Bath, 21 miles away. The bus was a slow but pleasant trip through many villages & was a great place to wander & explore its narrow streets full of spires. We went into the Roman Baths & Pump room, which was very interesting. We visited Sally Luns the oldest house in Bath built in 1680 & bakes the Lunn Bun.

I loved the joined buildings in the curved street – Royal Crescent that was built in the 1700’s

Sadly it was time to go home & we flew back to Denver & Mum & Dad joined us for another 2 weeks

Dad, Mum & Michael at the reception

Dad, Mum & Michael at the reception


Stephen & Michele

Stephen & Michele


The Groom & Bride

The Groom & Bride


The wedding reception

The wedding reception


Bath cathedral

Bath cathedral


Bishops Palace

Bishops Palace


White Hart Inn

White Hart Inn


Stephen on "THE" walk

Stephen on "THE" walk


Michael muddy  climbing a stile

Michael muddy climbing a stile


Wells Cathedral

Wells Cathedral

Posted by hillbillyramsey 17:00 Archived in United Kingdom

Email this entryFacebookStumbleUpon

Table of contents

Be the first to comment on this entry.

This blog requires you to be a logged in member of Travellerspoint to place comments.

Login